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If you are interested in worshiping with us, then why not become a member?  After talking to either the Dean or one of the Church Wardens, please contact the Electoral Roll Officer using the Contact Us Form.

 

St Mary's produces a monthly Parish Magazine which has a considerable distribution. If you wish to submit an article or advertise in this publication, please contact the Editor using the Contact Us Form.

Any items need to be submitted by the 10th of the preceding month.

Copies of this Parish Magazine are placed in surgeries, waiting rooms and receptions in Battle but you can receive a copy delivered or posted to your home.

Subscription: delivered locally £6 per year, by post £12 per year.

The Church of the Ascension (properly named "Chapel of the Ascension") stands on land given in 1875 by Sir Archibald Lamb.  The building was erected at the cost of the then Dean of Battle, Dean Crake. It was given a discretionary licence for use as a place of worship by the Bishop of Chichester in 1877, for the benefit of Battle residents, living at a distance from the Parish Church. 

Upon his death, Dean Crake bequeathed a sum of money towards the maintenance of the Church.  A trust deed was drawn up by the Charity Commission, (Dean Crake's Gift) the trustees of which are the current Dean of Battle and Churchwardens.  Fund raising is ongoing, on behalf of the trust, in order to maintain the Church and Churchyard. 

Church Redecoration

We have recently obtained some quotations for the much needed repair and redecoration to the interior of the Church. A faculty will have to be obtained and this is being applied for. Once we know which quotation is approved we shall have to address the question of finance. Dean Crake's Gift is the Charity which owns the Church and it maintains the fabric. Any shortfall in funds will have to be made up by enthusiastic fundraising!

Services at Church of the Ascension, Telham take place every Sunday apart from the fifth Sunday in the month. There is also a service on Ascension Day and, of course, Christmas Day. The pattern is usually:

First  Sunday                                    Holy Communion at 10:00 a.m.

Second Sunday                                 Matins at 10.00 a.m.

Third Sunday                                    Holy Communion at 10:00 a.m.

Fourth Sunday                                  Holy Communion at  9:30 a.m.

Fifth Sunday                                     United Service at St. Mary's Battle at 9:30 a.m.

All Services are from the Common Book of Prayer with Hymns ancient and modern.

The Church is grateful for the continual support of the following retired Clergy, who regularly take services:- The Rt. Revd. Ken Barham, Revd. Iain Morrison, Canon Dr. Edward Bryant, Revd. Paul Messenger and many others.

Important Notices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome and Where We Are

Welcome to all - especially visitors and newcomers.

The Church of the Ascension (Telham) can be found by taking Lower Lake (A2100)road, going south, which continues into Hastings Road.  After approximately two miles, The Church of the Ascension will be found on the left before you reach Hastings Golf and Country Club.

SatNav users can plug in TN33 0SH  for Church of the Ascension.

Enquiries: Hon. Secretary - Tel: 01424-772523

The Church of the Ascension, Telham has recently been renovated

A view of some of renovations that have taken place


 

 

 

If you are looking for information on ancestors, all records up to the 1960's are held at the Sussex Records Office
and the churchyard was closed for burials in the mid 19th Century. We do
hold the records for people whose ashes have been laid to rest in the Garden of
Remembrance from the 1960's to the present day.

Click here to go to the Sussex Records Office

 

 

'The Church of St. Mary at Battle must at one time have exhibited one of the most impressive painted interiors of the middle ages in Sussex. The whole area above the chancel arch was painted with the Three Living and the Three Dead (a warning of the emptiness of earthly rank and riches) and a great Last Judgement continued on the north and south walls of the Nave. The whole north wall of the Nave above the arcade was also painted, including the clerestory window splays.

Restoration in 1976-1978 by Clive Rouse and his associates has revealed the following: at the east end of the north wall, now partly concealed by new organ pipes, is a great procession of Blessed Souls about to be received into heaven by St. Peter part of the Last Judgement.  The whole of the rest of the wall is occupied by a series representing the life of St. Margaret of Antioch in twenty-four scenes. She is alleged to have lived in the Middle East in the fourth century and was one of the most popular saints in the Middle Ages, being invoked by women in childbirth. The scenes here are clearly based on the Life given in the Legenda Aurea of Nicholas de Jacobus Voragine

The series starts at the right hand (east) end with the upper row and reads westwards to the end, when the scenes return eastwards in the lower row. The scenes are somewhat repetitive, showing the birth of the Saint, her handing over to her Christian nurse, the approach of the Roman Provost Olybrius and her subsequent tortures, finally her execution, burial, and her soul received into Heaven.

The paintings are of the highest quality, and artistically very fine and consequently of great importance. There has been a much wider range of colour than in normal parish church paintings. On stylistic grounds one would be inclined to place these paintings at the end of thirteenth century or early in fourteenth century.'    (E. Clive Rouse)

The three brasses of note are, first, in the floor between the Lady Chapel and
the Chancel, a brass dated 1426 of Sir John Lowe in armour. In the floor of the
Sanctuary on the north side is a brass dated 1450 to the memory of Dean Clere.
He is depicted wearing mass vestments. On the south side of the Sanctuary is a
very fine Jacobean period brass to Dean Wythines 1615.

This was built circa 1350. To the right of the Holy Table is a fine ogee arch above twin Piscinae. In the middle ages these shallow stone basins were used for washing the Chalice and Paten after Mass.  The  beautiful  east window, installed in 1900, was inspired by the ancient hymn Te Deum Laudamus—it represents the worship of Almighty God by the Church triumphant in heaven and the Church militant on earth.  Between the Chapel and the High Altar is the Tudor tomb of Sir Anthony Browne and his first wife Alice. Sir Anthony was a favourite of King Henry VIll who granted him the Abbey and its estates in 1539 after the dissolution of the monasteries. The Lady Alice died in 1540, Sir Anthony in 1548. The alabaster tomb was probably made in London by Italian craftsmen and transported by cart to Battle.

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